This is one of the reasons that I only use Linux as a ‘Companion‘ and/or ‘Secondary‘ OS to my Win11 Pro computers. It is another reason why trying to run the latest Linux Kernel is a bad idea for most users. How many Linux users actually have the equipment that these ‘Bleeding Edge‘ Kernels are made for? Professionals sure. Home computer users rarely need anything but a basic stable Linux Kernel.

  • Only computer I have Linux as the primary OS on is the – converted $314.57 Chromebook – which runs the Stable Sparky Linux now. Older versions of Fedora (33 & 34) were fine on it, but major issues wid the Fedora 36 and a newer kernel. Tried the (Semi-)Rolling Sparky Linux, but it had issues also. Only a Stable Kernel Linux OS goes on that converted Chromebook now!

Running Linux 5.19.2 on an Intel Laptop Can Damage the Display

A recent version of the Linux kernel can create a nasty flickering effect on Intel-powered laptops—to the point the problem may damage the display.

The problem involves a bug in the 5.19.2 release for the Linux kernel. On Monday, an Intel software engineer named Ville Syrjälä noted(Opens in a new window) the software contains a “potentially bogus panel power sequencing delays, which may harm the LCD panel.”

“I recommend immediate revert of this stuff, and new stable release ASAP. Plus a recommendation that no one using laptops with Intel GPUs run 5.19.12,” Syrjälä wrote in the Linux kernel mailing list.

Here is the info from the Linux kernel mailing list:

Subject: Re: Regression on 5.19.12, display flickering on Framework laptop

After looking at some logs we do end up with potentially bogus panel power sequencing delays, which may harm the LCD panel.

Greg, I recommend immediate revert of this stuff, and new stable release ASAP. Plus a recommendation that no one using laptops with Intel GPUs run 5.19.12.

“Greg” would be this Greg Kroah-Hartman.

LINUX IS LIKE A BOX OF CHOCOLATES – you never know what you’re gonna get!