UPDATE 06/27/2020: Am reclaiming Media Library space by deleting old pics.

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Did a brief Clear Linux OS review back in May of this year, in a post by the same name – Clear Linux OS, and wanted to try it again today. Intel’s Clear OS has made some big improvements since May, but still has room for more improvements. More and easier to get to apps are needed, IMHO, e.g. I’m done with Clear OS until they make it a lot easier to get FreeOffice! I don’t want to mess with tar balls or tgz’s! Where are Synaptic Package Manager and Deb?! Where is KShutdown button? I don’t want the ANTIFA ‘Fanatical Linux’ users LibreOffice … where is FreeOffice and freedom of choice?! Anyway, it did pass ‘Ace’ the Laptop’s hardware tests, and it’s certainly a Linux Distro to keep yore eye on, especially with the backing and support of a company like Intel.

CLR 3

Here’s the ‘Live’ USB test going well on ‘Ace’ the Laptop … no problems with new hardware recognition or Wi-Fi. Of course, since it is Intel, Clear OS gets upstream immediately on their stuff:

 

Install and installer had some interesting features, compared to other installer’s. Installation was slow when compared to most Distros that I have tested. Hit the install button on left side of Dock:

 

Language (just 3?):

 

It does a “Prerequisites” check next – whatever that is, it passed:

 

Required Options – I went ahead and filled in that info:

 

Installation Media (part of Required Options) selections were worded differently than normal, but I selected “Destructive Installation” even tho it sounded terrible:

 

Manager User (part of Required Options) info:

 

Advanced Options were the next up:

 

Kernel Configuration – I went with default:

 

Before “Confirm Installation” popup, I had also gone thru “Select Additional Bundles” which wasn’t much – i.e. it didn’t offer FreeOffice or much else either…did add gimp, and then hit Install and re-confirmed it:

 

Installation was slow, and here Clear OS is on ‘Rose’ after installation:

 

The “Default Kernel” selection was:

 

Here’s the desktop and newly added Dash to Panel … did have to find a setting to turn off the old Dock to Dock that comes with it, i.e. one was on top of the other when set at bottom:

 

OK … worked well, for the most part, but not having an easy option for FreeOffice was a major disappointment. Still a work in progress…instead of a “Bleeding edge kernel” why not add some more apps, and make them easier to install!? Read where they were focused on the Clouds with this Distro, so maybe they don’t care about regular desktop/laptop users.