UPDATE 06/27/2020: Am reclaiming Media Library space by deleting old pics.

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WIN 7 series – Part 2: For those Windows 7 users who are thinking about trying Linux before investing in Windows 10. One of the main problems with Linux is Fragmentation – imagine Windows 7 having over 600 OSes to choose from – e.g. Windows 7 Alpha, Windows 7 Baylor, Windows 7 Charlie, Windows 7 Delta and so on for another 600+ choices. Now that’s only the beginning of the Linux Fragmentation problem, i.e. now imagine each of those over 600 Windows 7 OSes having another 3-7 choices of Desktop Environments (DE) and/or maybe a few ‘Flavors’ also…then each OS and each DE and each ‘Flavor’ having a different version of a Snipping Tool (in Linux it would be screenshot, GNOME screenshot, Spectacle or 600-2000+ other names for a Snipping Tool), and each also having a different name File Explorer (KDE calls it “Dolphin” and there are probably another 600 names for a File Explorer), etc.

To help eliminate the ridiculous amount of Linux fragmented choices, one needs to look for the truly supported ones – financially supported, developer supported, OEM supported, Long Term Support (LTS), large user support, etc. Most Linux Distros work with volunteer developers on a ‘Shoestring Budget’ and would probably all go under without the existence of Ubuntu, Red Hat and SUSE Linux. Some like Debian barely get by on name recognition from long ago and some servers running Debian. Without a doubt, Ubuntu is the Top Dog, especially when it comes to the Desktop/Laptop support and popularity.

GNOME and KDE are the two most supported and popular open-source Desktop foundations – providing the GNOME and KDE DE’s. Ubuntu has 7 Flavors, and Kubuntu offers the KDE Plasma, which I have installed today. Ubuntu also has 8 Desktop Environments (DE) to choose from, and all are easily installed and just as easy to switch around…today, I also installed the KDE – Full DE into my Ubuntu OS by simply using Synaptic Package Manager, and avoided the Command Prompt method. BTW, I use Ubuntu 18.04.2, which has the longest Long Term Support (LTS) of all Linux Distros, i.e. 10 years. I tested Kubuntu for its KDE Plasma DE, but will only keep it for a short time…probably. Right now I have it installed alongside Mint “Tina” on a 128GB SSD, but Ubuntu and WIN10 are my main OSes…if I like KDE, I can simply logout from the ‘Dash to Panel’ and then click on the KDE Plasma setting at login window…then I’m back at the KDE DE. Ubuntu is incredibly flexible and customizable; however, I have grown use to GNOME over the last 6 months, and basically stick to it other than during tests…switched to the GNOME ‘Dash to Panel’ since it offers the thumbnail previews, and I do like how it feels like a Windows OS.

I downloaded the Kubuntu kubuntu-18.04.2-desktop-amd64 iso this morning…roughly a 1.9GB iso, and installed it to a ‘Live’ USB before actually installing it. The ‘Live’ USB gives you the opportunity to do some testing and setting changes before actually installing. Excellent Operating System! Installed quick and easy. It will take time to go thru this one – extremely customizable, and comes with the preview thumbnails. Let’s get to it…hit the Install button!

 

Welcome and such…

 

Normal installation, Updates and third-party stuff…

 

Beautifully done “Installation type” with proper options offered, and a great “Before” and “After” disk preview, with the option to also resize…

 

That was one of the best “Installation type” that I have seen offered (Debian should be arrested for posing as a Linux Distro!) … installation flew by, and then…

 

Reboot to desktop…

 

Kubuntu on ‘Rose’ the main Linux test computer…

 

Another wallpaper shot before ending the Kubuntu installation portion…

 

OK…one more of an interesting image viewer (see lower right)…

 

Yep, this Kubuntu is heading into Karmi’s Top 10 Linux Distros page – it just passed ‘Ace’ the Laptop hardware ‘Live’ USB test, though like Mint “Tina” recently, I had to change laptop’s BIOS from UEFI to Legacy (new laptop and many Distros have failed this hardware test)…also didn’t automatically see the Wireless connection, but I found it after searching, punched in security code and connecting to Wi-Fi. Yes, an excellent Operating System – Top to Bottom!

OK…next came the KDE-Full DE install. I hate the Command Prompt/Terminal and try to avoid it as much as I can – reminds me of 1992 and my ‘DOS Days’. Ubuntu Software and the Synaptic Package Manager handle most of my add-on stuff, but I do occasionally have to use the terminal. Here are some pics on how I added the KDE Plasma DE, and it begins with a search of Synaptic Package Manager for “kde full”…

 

KDE-Full DE was almost 1GB…there are smaller KDE Plasma versions, but I didn’t try any of them. Once the search results came up, I marked the kde-full selection…

 

Additional required parts are needed and I approve them by clicking “Mark” button…

 

Next, with everything needed marked I select “Apply” at center top…

 

It asks for confirmation before proceeding and select Apply at bottom right…

 

Success and changes were applied…

 

OOOPS! Looks like I missed the “display manager” screenshot … I don’t like the default KDE Spectacle snapshot, so must’ve missed. Anyway, as the installation neared the end, a popup/window shows up asking if you want gdm3 or sddm – choose SDDM as the display manager. Looked something like this…

 

Now the user needs to logout and then log back in … have never figured out how to take a screenshot while off the desktop, so borrowed the following one from LinuxConfig.org and then edited it…

 

See the little red rectangle that I added in the lower left corner – inside is “Desktop Session: Plasma” with a drop-down next to it. That’s where you switch DE’s before logging back in, if you want to get back to GNOME or Cinnamon or whichever other DE you have added to Ubuntu. OK…think that’s it, and again, congrats to Kubuntu for making it into the Top 10!

(NOTE: have created a new page – WIN 7 series: For Windows 7 users)