UPDATE 11/23/2020: Am reclaiming Media Library space by deleting old pics. Trying to thin out the Media Library’s pics from posts that get few visits … hopefully it doesn’t ruin your view of the post.

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Rule of Thumb – if you can’t install Ubuntu on it, then you can’t install any Linux Distro on it.’ Ubuntu 18.04.2 is Baaaaaaack as my #1 Linux Distro, and no wonder that Ubuntu is the most popular Linux Distro! From newbies, old timers, Developers, Enterprise, etc. Ubuntu fits everyone – and Ubuntu is amongst the best supported Linux Distros (probably the best DE supported Distro). In the recent Linux – Laptops – ‘Living’ Posts, I covered buying a budget laptop for testing Linux on, how to switch out a 2 ½” HDD for a new SSD (prices keep getting closer to $1 per 10GB’s for the 120-250GB range), quit being fearful of your computer (especially if it’s a bargain priced one), and how to avoid mixing Windows MBR with the Linux Grub. Don’t get me wrong, it’s not the ‘End of the World’ if Linux corrupts your Windows MBR with that Grubbie ‘Thang, but I have always found it a pain to fix – such a pain in fact, that I have looked for ways to stop Windows and Linux from ever seeing each other on any of my computers. The 5.25 to 3.5 Hard Drive Hot Swap Bay-Trayless-Hard Drive Bay-HDD Caddy solves the problem on Desktop PC’s, and along with a SATA Hard Drive Adapter Converter (allows SSD’s to fit) OSes never have to see each other (see post: Case Conversions and Idle Spaces for pics of Hot Swap Bay and HDD-SSD Converter, also remember to lift a little wire-guide on top when removing the HDD-SSD Converter). Laptops, budget laptops anyway, don’t seem to provide an easy way of switching HDD/SSD in order to keep OSes away from each other, and Windows 10 doesn’t like being put in one of those eSATA or USB Docks (WIN10 wants to be directly connected to that MB by SATA, in my experience).

Another thing that I am learning about Laptops is…that if you are not careful, you could probably end up with more cables attached to it than any Desktop PC in history ever had. I ran the laptop through a lot of tests today, had a 4-PORT USB 3.0 HUB WITH POWER SWITCHES plugged into the 3.0 USB port, at least 2 USB Flash drives in it, plus a cable running to a 3.0 USB Dock and also a USB to SATA cable plugged into it. Other side of the laptop had two 2.0 USB’s plugged into those ports…one more USB and I would’ve needed a 4-PORT USB 2.0 HUB WITH POWER SWITCHES on that side!?! Did have the laptop’s power cable plugged in on that side.

There was the new 240GB SSD inside the laptop, a 120GB SSD dangling from the 4-port hub attached to the USB to SATA cable, and that original vibrating 2 ½” 1000GB HDD (now in 4 partitions – a pic of that later) plugged into the USB Dock…one partition had the newly installed Xubuntu on it (a pic coming later). I managed to keep both of the Linux Distros away from the WIN10 MBR, but what was the point if it required such a mess on what is supposed to be a portable laptop?! Do people need 3 or 4 bags to carry these so-called portable laptops? At some point, Xubuntu’s Grub got into Mint’s Grub, and I ended up deleting both of those distros.

Decided to give Ubuntu 18.04.2 a test-run on this wire/cable/dock/hub/usb/etc mess before cleaning up…what a pleasure Ubuntu 18.04.2 is to work with, and to install – had just installed it on the reformatted former Xubuntu partition, and I suddenly remembered that Ubuntu 18.04.2 just got its ‘End of Life’ extended to April 2028…that’s APRIL of 2028! Scheesh, talk about a Linux Distro that gets great support – 2028 means there is no need to be installing new versions of Ubuntu onto this Laptop (i.e. more installs leads to more chances of corrupting WIN10’s MBR). These recent tests have shown me that Linux can be installed on any partition and/or SSD without using the “Alongside of Windows” method or the wire/cable/dock/hub/usb/etc mess.

I’ve got a pile of pics coming – of the above tests, and of the new install of Ubuntu 18.04.2 onto the same 240GB internal SSD that WIN10 is on. Gave WIN 10 a roughly 180GB partition (i.e. resized it) and made a new roughly 50GB partition that I then installed Ubuntu on. In BIOS, I can change or set which OS automatically boots, or just use the F12 Boot Menu if I want to switch OSes. Now, ‘Ace’ (my laptop) is truly portable when needed, with both Ubuntu and WIN10 on the same SSD – which means no need for wire/cable/dock/hub/usb/etc mess…can hook those up for backups and such, but ‘Ace’ is really no longer a test Laptop; well, *MAYBE* not! 😉

Here’s that 2 1/2″ 1000GB HDD that came w/ the Acer laptop, partitioned…note: Xubuntu and then Ubuntu were being installed on /dev/sdb3 partition (testing if a newbie could figure out how to install Linux onto a pre-partitioned drive – w/o having to use the “Install Alongside Windows” method…

Installation process pre-selects that “Install _ _ _ alongside Windows Boot Manager” but I am trying the “Something else” choice…

Let’s take a quick spin thru the Installation process…from ‘Live’ USB testing, we are ready to install – see ‘Install Ubuntu’ icon on left side…click it…

Language…

Keyboard…

This time, I selected ‘Do Not Connect to Internet‘ but normally prefer to connect…

Usually select ‘Normal Installation’ … have recently stopped selecting the ‘Install third-party software‘ because it has been requiring a ‘Password’ thingie – maybe it’s just a laptop thing, but it’s new to me…(*UPDATE* – during a later test involving the installing of Mint onto a ‘Rose’ computer SSD, there was no password requirement for installing 3rd Party software – so it might just be a laptop thing, for some reason!?)

‘Something else’ again…no FEAR! 😉

/dev/sdb3 partition again …

Note that you also select /dev/sdb3  down in the “Device for boot loader installation” in that same window, where arrow points…

Still in the same window .. look for that “+ – Change” section at lower left…click Change and get a “Edit Partition” popup … hey, I never said this was easy – just a way to protect WIN10’s MBR from the Linux Grubbie ‘Thang (YUCK!) 😉 Now, Click the “Use as:” drop-down and select “Ext4 journaling file system…

That brings up the “Mount point” … BTW, ever have some radical Linux user tell you that “Linux is soooooooooo much easier than Windows” … anyway, select “/” for the mount point…

Know how many times I’ve had to try “Something else” before I finally got it to work? Then guess how many more times it took me before finally remembering how I had done it that one time – so looooooong ago? Note the “/” in the /dev/sdb3 orange highlight row now. Anyway, it’s time to hit “Install Now” @ lower right…

Hit continue on next popup…

Ditto on the continue, again…

Fill in some “Where are you?” and “Who are you?” … I like to automatically login w/o a password, it’s just below password section – Karma only knows how many times Linux will ask for a password, so I skip the login one. Then it’ll start installing … finish, and you can restart. I have all those pics also, but am not sure how many WP allows….and, I have more coming up now…like also adding a Cinnamon Desktop Environment – though I am liking Gnome more everyday (even w/ logout button stuck in upper right corner) …

Cinnamon System Info…

More Cinnamon – updated: now showing 64GB partition on laptop…

6 cinnamon

DE back to Bionic Beaver…and some quick tweaks…

If I want Cinnamon, I don’t need Mint … just logout, select Cinnamon and log back in…probably also add Deepin DE for another occasional change…

Added Deepin DE this morning…

1deepin

System Deepin DE info…

4 system info

Deepin apps window…

3 apps

Switch from dock to a panel…

5 panel

Here’s the Gparted view of partitioned internal SSD for WIN10 and Ubuntu…note that each software (OS, Gparted, etc.) shows a different size, apparently difference between GB and GiB…

2 win ubu

OK…that’s Gnome, Cinnamon and Deepin DE’s, with Ubuntu and WIN10 sharing same drive…w/o being “Alongside“!