UPDATE 06/27/2020: Am reclaiming Media Library space by deleting old pics.

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Well .. Starting Over, Back to the Beginning, Déjà vu and the Inherent Confusion of Linux. Three months since my Debian Flavors and/or Desktop Environments (DE) – testing’em post, and I’m back at the starting-gate. It was confusing back then, fortunately it’s actually less confusing now, but just too many terms and versions, IMHO. Perhaps this is why I am still a Linux newbie after 23 years!? Anyway, am going to start over, since I at least know a little something about GNOME, Cinnamon, KDE Plasma, etc now.

I am going to set some Linux terms for myself – no more trying to figure which and/or what Linux term is used by one of the Linux distro communities:

A Linux distribution (often abbreviated as distro) is an operating system made from a software collection, which is based upon the Linux kernel and, often, a package management system … SNIP … Almost six hundred Linux distributions exist, with close to five hundred out of those in active development.

Since Wikipedia says they are “distributions” I’ll stick w/ that, and mainly use the abbreviated ‘Distros’ term for the almost 600 distributions (‘Distro’ singular). Okay – that’s one fixed term!

Now, let me address the inherent confusion brought about by the terms Editions, Flavors, Desktop Environments, etc for apparently the same thing (just called differently in various Linux Distro communities) … it’s the look and feel of the desktop, so the new fixed term will be – ‘Desktop’ for the desktop. Distro and Desktop work for me!

I was preparing a test report post on Linux Manjaro last night – was about to give it a failing grade of nothing more than a lite-version of Ubuntu 18.04, when it suddenly struck me that both of these Distros I was looking at were the GNOME Desktop. Durn! Went to Manjaro website (very well done website, BTW), and noticed they had 12 “Editions.” One was a Cinnamon “Edition,” so I clicked on that to see its desktop view. It looked like the Logout/Power off button was in lower left corner, just like Mint. Then wondered if Ubuntu had a Desktop with the Logout/Power off button in lower left corner – and they had Kubuntu, which I had downloaded weeks ago, but never tested. Burned the ISO to DVD and tested it…nice, and Logout/Power off button in lower left corner!

Ubuntu 18.04.2 GNOME is falling in my personal Distro rankings…falling fast, actually. I haven’t tested all the Desktops in other Distros, but besides Ubuntu, I have also tested Mint’s Cinnamon, Kubuntu’s KDE Plasma and Manjaro’s Cinnamon. Look at Ubuntu’s GNOME:

That’s the standard Ubuntu GNOME with a “Dock” on left side of Desktop. I have no idea what the Logout/Power off, settings date & time, network, etc bar across the top is called…none nada zip!? It can’t be moved or added to; however, the “Dock” (called “Panel” in other Distros) can be moved to bottom or right from the left:

Here’s Mint’s desktop Cinnamon:

Mint comes with the “Panel” located at bottom, but you can add or remove other panels to the right, left, and/or top – giving you a total of four panels – here w/ two panels (top and bottom):

Kubuntu’s KDE Plasma and Manjaro’s Cinnamon can also add or remove panels. Both were impressive in today’s tests.

Where does Linux get new users from? Guessing here, but probably from MS Windows. Windows 10 calls their “Panel” or “Dock” area the “Taskbar.” The Taskbar comes located at the bottom (it can be moved to right, left or top), so it’s probably an advantage to any Linux Distro that offers their “Panels” or “Docks” on the bottom. I started with Ubuntu and Puppy years ago, when none of the other distros worked on my computers (or maybe on just one), so had stayed like that until this recent batch of distros. Still always disliked Ubuntu’s power button stuck up in that upper right hand corner, even tho the OS worked otherwise.

Are you a Windows user thinking about trying Linux? Look for a Linux Distro offering the Cinnamon or KDE Plasma Desktop, IMHO.